Unit History
On April 28th, 1862 the Fourth Missouri Infantry Regiment mustered into the Confederate Army in Memphis, Tennessee.

Commanded by Col. Archibald MacFarlane, Lt. Col. Waldo P. Johnson, Maj. Stephen W. Wood. This regiment was formed by the merging of the 1st Missouri Infantry Battalion, Fagin's and MacFarlane's Infantry Battalions. However short lived as on Nov. 7th 1862 it was merged with the 1st Missouri Infantry Regiment to form the "1st and 4th Consolidated Missouri Infantry Regiment". It was an integral part of the Missouri Brigade attached to Price/Little's Division and Bowen's Division.

Formation & Background​

On October 31, 1861, the Missouri legislature passed a secession act, ratified the Confederate constitution, and petitioned for admittance into the Confederate States of America. On November 25, 1861, General Price advised the Missouri State Guard (MSG) that the Confederate Government would receive into service as many troops from Missouri as may volunteer to serve twelve month. 
On January 23, 1862, in Springfield (Missouri), General Price issued an order formalizing the organization of the Missouri Confederate volunteers into two brigades. The First brigade, commanded by Colonel Henry Little, included:

  • Colonel Elijah Gates - First Cavalry
  • Colonel John Q. Burbridges - Second Infantry
  • Colonel Benjamin A. Rives - Third Infantry
  • Captain William Wades - First Battery of Artillery
  • Captain Samuel Churchill Clarks - Second Battery of Artillery

​The Second Brigade, commanded by Missouri State Guard Brigadier General William Yarnell Slack, included all other Confederate volunteer units (i.e., Company E, 4th MO Infantry) that had not yet reached full strength. These units were:

  • ​Colonel Robert S. Beviers battalion of infantry
  • Colonel Thomas H. Rossers battalion of infantry
  • Colonel Robert McCullochs battalion of cavalry
  • Captain Henry Lucas squad of artillery
  • Captain Henry Landis squad of artillery

​Together with all others not already enlisted in the First or Second Brigades. One extra battalion of Confederate volunteers was placed under the command of Missouri State Guard General McBride. 
Unit Formation

Company E of the 4th Missouri Infantry (CSA) was formed from Missouri State Guard (MSG) Companies that had been mustered into service on March 25, 1861, by Colonel James Shaler (detailed by General Frost). Company E was formed on March 25, 1862, when Captain Norval Spangler's Company and Captain Stephen W. Wood's Company were consolidated into Company E (4th Missouri Infantry) with Norval Spangler remaining as Captain (Spangler had been elected his company's captain on February 9, 1862, and Wood had been elected his companies captain in February, 1862). 

The majority of the men in Company E were from Henry County (Spangler's Company) and Laclede County (Wood's Company) in southwest Missouri. These men were hardy and self-reliant mountaineers and were some of the MSGs best troops. Like all frontiersman, they were shrewd, quick-witted, wary, cunning, and ready for all emergencies, and like all backwoodsmen, their courage was serene, steady, unconscious. (Page 93, The Souths Finest, The First Missouri Confederate Brigade from Pea Ridge to Vicksburg by Phillip Thomas Tucker). When the 4th Missouri Volunteer Infantry was merged with the 1st Missouri Infantry, Company E of the 4th Missouri Infantry was consolidated with Company H of the 4th Missouri Infantry to form Company E of the 1st & 4th Consolidated Missouri Infantry.


The volunteers would be placed under the command of Major General Price. On December 2, 1861, while the MSG was in winter camp at Osceola (Missouri), General Price established a separate camp nearby for volunteers for the Confederate State Army (CSA). Colonel Henry Little, a former officer in the MSG, was given command of the Confederate camp after returning from Richmond where he had been commissioned a Colonel in the CSA. Colonel Little began recruiting volunteers for the First and the Second Missouri Confederate Brigades.n October 31, 1861, the Missouri legislature passed a secession act, ratified the Confederate constitution, and petitioned for admittance into the Confederate States of America. On November 25, 1861, General Price advised the Missouri State Guard (MSG) that the Confederate Government would receive into service as many troops from Missouri as may volunteer to serve twelve month. 





John Marion Ragland of the 1/4th consolidated infantry storming the 39th Iowa fortifications and capturing their flag.​



    The Souths Finest military unit and, arguably, the best military unit on either side, the Missouri Brigade was one of the first and last units to see action in the Civil War. Between 1861 and 1865, the Missouri Brigade saw action in 13 major battles, 6 sieges, and numerous other engagements. Of the more than 8,000 Missouri soldiers who fought in the Missouri Brigade, only 300 were left after the last battle in April 1865.​


Regimental Commander 1st/4th Missouri Consolidated

Hugh Garland joined the 1st Missouri Infantry as a captain in June 1861; 
Major Garland was promoted to lieutenant colonel on May 16, 1863, and to colonel and commander of 1st & 4th Missouri Consolidated Infantry regiment on May 30, 1864. Colonel Garland was killed holding the regimental colors during the Brigades assault on Union fortifications at Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30, 1864.”

On the fifth of October, 1864, Confederate forces under General S.G. French assaulted the fortified Union garrison at the strategic post of Allatoona Pass, Georgia. With courage equaled only by the Northern defenders, Cockrell's Missourians poured over the earthworks of Rowett's Redoubt in one of the most ferocious hand-to-hand struggles of the war. The defenders including the 39th Iowa and 7th Illinois regiments, fought practically to the last. At the climax of the fighting, as Sergeant John M. Ragland of the 1st-4th Missouri seized the 39th's flag, his Captain, Joseph Boyce hurled a dirt clod into the Federal color bearer's face. Although initially successful, the Confederates were ultimately unable to take the main Union fort and withdrew after successive attempts with heavy loss.​

Colonel Hugh Garland